Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy

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A comparison of psychotherapy techniques: Person-Centred, Cognitive Behaviour and Solution Focused Brief Therapy. Student’s Names Course code: Professor University/Institution Location Date Introduction For, decades, the desire to comprehend or understand how psychotherapy help individuals change their lives has been a motivating factor for most psychological philosophers, theorists, and academicians as well as practitioners and counsellors. This has led to voluminous accumulation of psychotherapy literature, giving theoretical and empirical studies on the mechanisms that facilitate the therapeutic process and changes on the clients or patients. Psychotherapy has been known to be a form of treatment which is based on systematic…show more content…
In additions, it emphasizes on therapists values and attitude with limited acknowledgement of skills. For non-verbal client, using this method can be difficult. Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy Rational emotive behaviour therapy (REBT) was developed by psychologist Albert Ellis in 1950s as a result of his dissatisfaction with the traditional psychoanalytical approach and also the person centred therapy. REBT follows primarily cognitive approach, however, with some significant behavioural and emotive aspects (Corey, 2011). The philosophical point of views of REBT were developed from hedonism, humanistic as well as rational views. Hedonism explains the concepts of seeking pleasure and avoiding pain, responsible hedonism therefore primarily maintains pleasure over long-term while avoiding short-term pleasures that can result in pain. The humanistic view of REBT involve viewing human beings as holistic, goal oriented and have interests. On other hand, the rational view of REBT entails using efficient, flexible, logical and scientific ways that can be used to achieve goals and values in presence of feelings/emotions (Dozois & Beck,…show more content…
It considers that human-beings have goals that may be supported or thwarted by activating events or agents (making the As). The person then reacts with something to the activating agent, either conscious or unconscious based on their belief system (B). In addition, they also experience the emotional and behavioural consequence of the activating agent (C). When the activating events result in pleasant reactions and it supports their goals and are incongruent with the belief system. However, when the activating events no longer support the goals of an individual, it can potentially cause disturbance in the belief system in a way congruent to it (rational). Or they may react with irrational beliefs (Dryden,
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