The Atomic Bomb Book Review

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The use of the atomic bomb saved lives by preventing an invasion of Japan that could have resulted in up to 1 million casualties. Though Katharine was in favor of the discovery of nuclear fission, she was very opposed to the use of the atomic bomb; however, her intentions of not using the weapon were in vein. Having risen to prominence as a scientist despite the gender discrimination she faced, Katharine gathered the strength to help the military of the United States in an effort to end World War II as quickly as possible. Instead of aligning herself with weapons of mass destruction, she used her intelligence to aid the cause of humanity and prevent future use of such weapons. During World War II, Way refused to put her knowledge to harmful…show more content…
She began to research nuclear decay and specialized in the collection and organization of nuclear data while continuing her research on fission products. Katherine Way, alongside Dexter Masters, findings at ORNL contributed to their co-edited “One World or None: a Report to the Public on the Full Meaning of the Atomic Bomb”. Within the novel, Katharine depicts the truth behind the atomic bomb as, “an illuminating, powerful, threatening and hopeful science which will terrify a lot of confused thoughts about atomic energy.” The book takes on the concern over the morality and use of the atomic bomb on Japan and its future role in society. Katharine was credited with the creation of “One World or None” which soon became a New York Times best seller, selling over 100,000…show more content…
She was 92 when she passed away. “Physics Today” commemorated Katherine Way through an obituary that described her as “A person who expressed herself passionately not only about the analysis of nuclear data, but also about many issues of human fairness and social justice.” In such matters, she was an outspoken advocate rather than merely a sympathetic bystander. After her death, her legacy lives on in her discoveries and the institute that she helped to build. In the last years of her life, Katharine “Kay” Way was most concerned with social justice and fairness. Today, Katharine’s works are preeminent scientific discoveries, both in nuclear theory and physics in general. The facilities at Oak ridge laboratories in Tennessee are still in use today. Sadly, some of her work on “Nuclear Data Sheets and Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables” has been lost through many stages of
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