Reflection On Social Marginalisation

1625 Words7 Pages
Social marginalisation has extreme consequences for any society. Unpleasant stereotypes of certain people, linked with discriminatory views can have a damaging influence on a particular group or community. I carried out my volunteering in DCU with the intergenerational learning programme, as a mentor, assisting older adults in the community in how to use their mobile devices. I really wanted to delve into the true experiences of what it was like to be an older person living in our society today, as there is a significant increase in ageism. It is quite common that many people look on older people as a burden, and they are often denied access to resources or services due to their age. According to the National Positive Ageing Strategy, older…show more content…
It is easy to presume that older adults will find a mobile device as simple to use as you do. My first week, I was introduced to a lady called Lily, and each week she came in with a list of what she wanted to do that day. I found myself looking forward to each new week, and also to seeing Lily. We developed a great friendship and got to know each other really well. I found that many of the older people who came to our class would look forward to their interactions with the mentors and often said it was the highlight of their day. Growing technology is often like a foreign language to the older generation, according to a few of the people I talked to. However, if older people remain offline they will become increasingly excluded as it becomes more frequently used. When Lily first came in, the only thing she knew how to do was turn her mobile phone and tablet on. Throughout the weeks, she learned how to download apps, use the internet, and even wanted to learn how to take a…show more content…
The importance of knowing how to use technology is vital for every member of society and we often take it for granted. Something as simple as using the internet can save a lot of problems such as being able to order shopping to your home if you are unwell or even communicating with loved ones abroad (Peacock and Kunemund, 2007). We need to show older people what technology can do for them. In this day and age there is no shortage of technology designed for older people, from hearing aids to more complex gadgets such as dementia wander alarms. But what is the benefit of an older person having these without even the basic skills. Lily expressed to me on several occasions that she found the technology led society in which we live was quite overwhelming. She felt excluded from society due to the increase in technology in which younger age groups perhaps take for granted. According to Hogan (2006), Lily was not alone, as the percentage of technophobia (a fear of technology) in Irish men and women over sixty-five who participated in this study was 48%, and higher levels of technophobia were associated with females. Learning how to use technology encourages older people to develop and maintain social connections, improve their quality of life, and prevent depression as a result of social isolation. Due to being widowed and living
Open Document