Relapse Prevention

1271 Words6 Pages
There are as many Relapse Prevention (RP) plans as there are types of addictions. In the treatment of substance use disorders, the most popular evidence-based RP plans are modeled after Marlatt’s cognitive-behavioral approach (Jackson, 2014) and Gorski’s CENAPS system which parallels the stages of recovery. In addition to discussing the some important common components of any RP plan, this paper shall also delineate the importance of the continuum of care in relapse prevention. Stabilization and Assessment: Foundational Components of the Continuum of Care In the beginning, the RP plan is rather straightforward. The goal is essentially to do whatever it takes for the client to achieve abstinence. It will necessitate detoxification, probably…show more content…
Stress management is a good foundation for daily living, but more tools must be added through relapse education in the remaining stages of recovery if the client is to have the best chance of avoiding relapse. The ability to identify and manage warning signs is vital for self-regulation (Gorski, 1986). Warning signs are indicators that relapse syndrome is taking place. A simple example of using signs to self-regulate is the HALT warning heard in many support groups about the danger of becoming too Hungry, Angry, Lonely, or Tired in recovery. This is a good rule of thumb, but every client has a unique set of problems and symptoms that indicate relapse syndrome is occurring. These can include external or internal situations, health problems, cognitive and emotional issues, poor judgment, and questionable behavior (Gorski, 1986). The client should be helped to compile a list of personal warning signs and taught how to manage them. It should be emphasized to the client that if he or she desires to remain clean and sober, new and better methods of handling the problems and symptoms on the warning sign list must be found. Alternative solutions to old stumbling blocks must be…show more content…
Social contexts will become a more significant factor when the scope of treatment expands to include the client’s family and social circle. The client’s gender identity, ethnicity, culture, religious beliefs, and family history will determine what are appropriate referrals and treatment approaches. For example, recovery planning for a Latino woman should allow for her “personal growth and empowerment within a [Latino] cultural and family context” (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), 2009) and referrals to community resources and case managers who specialize in the needs of the Latino community (CSAT, 2009), especially if she is a recent immigrant. Meanwhile, recovery planning for the African-American man should “adopt an Afrocentric perspective to provide a more culturally responsive treatment program” (CSAT, 2009) and include strategies that foster the client’s involvement in the community. When treating minority populations, there may be a greater need for experienced counselors with more developed cultural competence and self-awareness for the purposes of family therapy, which is an integral component of
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