Relatable Characters In To Kill A Mockingbird

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Throughout all periods of time there has been writing, some much better than the rest. It is these books that are considered timeless classics. But first, what is required to consider a book a timeless classic? For one, the book must have unique but relatable characters. The characters must be relatable to evoke sympathy from readers and must have a unique storyline. No one will feel attached to a character that has a plain, boring story. Second, the book must have an intriguing plot and/or plot twists. To keep readers engaged, a novel must have good or interesting plot. A key element of this is having plot twists or unexpected turns to keep readers guessing or to keep them “in to” the book. Due to the unique but realistic characters for…show more content…
In the beginning, Mr. Arthur Radley’s son generally roused a lot of trouble and caused a ruckus, culminating in him and his friends locking the town sheriff inside a courthouse. However, Mr. Radley didn’t know that his son was causing trouble until he was arrested. In the words of Scout, “Nobody in Maycomb had nerve enough to tell Mr. Radley that his boy was in the wrong crowd.”(10). This quote perfectly sums up the unique but relatable character criteria. The quote is not portraying people as heroes all the time. No one wanted to be the bearer of bad news, or had “nerve enough” which is relatable, but the way it’s presented is very different. Because Maycomb is such a small town, any rabble rousing would not be tolerated, but the boy was Arthur Radley’s and no one wanted to upset Mr. Radley. Later on, after Scout invites Walter Cunningham over for lunch, she comments on Walter’s excessive use of syrup and calls him out. An enraged Calpurnia summons her to the kitchen and says, “There’s some folks who don’t eat like us,’ she whispered fiercely, ‘but you ain’t called on to contradict ‘em at the table when they don’t. That boy’s yo’ comp’ny and if he wants ro eat up the table cloth you let him, you…show more content…
A good plot is always essential and plot twists keep the readers guessing and “in to” the book. After the news broke that Tom Robinson was accused of rape, a mob of white men, among them Mr. Cunningham (Walter’s Father), set out to the county jail to create their own justice. Atticus was there to try and stop them. Lucky for him, Scout, Jem, and Dill followed him. When the mob threatened Atticus, Scout leaped blindly out of the bushes and confronted the mob. She spotted Mr. Cunningham and talked about Walter, his son, and reminded everyone present that they were human. Atticus was shocked as well with “[his] mouth half open, an attitude he had once described as uncouth.” And with that, Mr. Cunningham said, “‘I’ll tell him you said hey, little lady’ he said. Then he straightened up and waved a big paw. ‘Let’s clear out,’ he called, ‘let’s get going boys.’”(206). The mob showing up to hang Tom Robinson already shows signs of a good plot and somewhat realistic conflict, but Scout confronting them is a major twist. The notion that a 9 year old girl could dispel a mob of angry, drunk men is almost unthinkable. But Scout did it, and elicits a fond response from Mr. Cunningham with him calling her, “little lady” which brings the mob back to civility. Later on, after Tom’s fateful trial, some alarming
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