Relationship Between Frankenstein And The Creature In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Former president John F. Kennedy once said “ A man does what he must – in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers and pressures – and that is the basis of all human morality”. Kennedy spoke these words to explain how he sees morality within the world and these words hold extreme relevance within Frankenstein as the two main character’s grapple with their morality throughout the story. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein constantly pursues the search for higher knowledge and that leads him to creating life. His decision to abandon the creature sets him on the path that leads to the creature killing everyone that Victor loved. We see how the Creature developed his own morality based on how society treated him, the cottagers he viewed, and the literature he viewed. In Frankenstein readers see Mary Shelley develop the concept of morality throughout the story within the characters by displaying the relationship between Victor and the Creature. Frankenstein introduces the main character, Victor Frankenstein, relatively early and we learn of his early childhood. He started as an innocent child fascinated by science, always striving to learn more and more. (Insert quote from childhood here). His morality as a character is…show more content…
In Frankenstein readers see firsthand as Mary Shelley develops the concept of morality throughout the story within the characters by displaying the relationship between Victor and the Creature. This is evident in the real world as well as morality affects our everyday decisions. From giving a homeless man money to donating blood, it is a constant factor in human society. Mary Shelley clearly tried to reflect society as she saw it in the characters she created and she succeeded as you see purity develop and deteriorate throughout the entirety of the
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