Relationship To Jews In Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe

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Introduction For the current book review the novel “Ivanhoe” of the great Scottish writer, Sir Walter Scott, was chosen. Among the classics of the world literature the name of Sir Walter Scott takes far not the last place. The admitted master of the historical novel, Walter Scott, is well known as an author of numerous works of literature and real masterpieces in the world literature treasury. Interesting fact is that he was starting his literary path as a poet, but the biggest success Walter Scott gained as the prosaic, his novels made him a world-known writer and gained his place among the greatest names of world literature legacy. The big master of the Word, Walter Scott, with all his mastery, takes the reader to ages of past, to a journey…show more content…
Love of Rebecca to Ivanhoe is touching, pure is clean, in spite of his nobility, after learning that Rebecca is Jewish his relation from the grateful sympathy in her help in heeling him and his wounds, changes to a to a more cool respect and esteem. Another colourful demonstration of relation to Jews in the Medieval times. Of course the feelings of respect and thankfulness are stronger in Ivanhoe, then a disdain dictated by his religious views, and he comes as fast as he can, still suffering from his wounds, to a fight Bois-Guilbert, to fight in defending an honour of Rebecca. He stays no longer after the end of the fight and leaves without saying a word to her. An undivided and even forbidden love of Rebecca to Ivanhoe is really touching, tragic and sad and really one of the main lines in the novel. Brian de Bois-Guilbert as one of the main antagonists demonstrates all the agony of his soul, he suffers from his own depravity and sinfulness, in the end he becomes a victim of his own passions. Another main theme is concerned of Cedric the Saxon, there is no other character in the book more stubborn, taught and inexorable to his views. But during the development of his acquaintance with King Richard the stone of his persuasions and beliefs gives a crack and in the end he changes his views about the Normans and their relations with Saxons. Another wise lesson from Sir Walter…show more content…
The way Sir Walter Scott have written the book, is an extraordinary simpleness from one side, from another he shows and absolute mastery of making an atmosphere and full immersion in the world of the book, reach stile and dialogs won’t leave indifferent any reader. The scenic pictures of the far past nearly come to live, like an old memories, giving an opportunity to the reader to feel himself if not a participant, than at least an eyewitness of the events. The book fully takes readers attention and it’s really hard to draw it away during the reading, from the first to the very last page the excitement not leaves the reader, this is probably the main sign of the great book, and for me “Ivnahoe” is definitely one of these books. Very moral and exceptional book, true classics at all
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