Relationship With The Natural World In C. S. Lewis Mere Christianity

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Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis, can be connected to many of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition core claims and questions. That being said, the core question “What is our relationship with the Natural World?” is actually heavily based off of this book. In book one, Lewis gives the readers a description of all the natural laws we can be faced with in this world. The Law of Human Nature, on page 4 and 5 he says “this law or rule is about right and wrong… it is called the Law of Nature because people thought that everyone knew it by nature and does not need to be taught it.” This is absolutely true, we as human are taught what is right and what is wrong. If something is wrong, then we know that we will get punished for it. Whereas, if something was right, we will get rewarded. For instance, crime. If you murdered another human, you will end up in jail for a lifetime as a punishment. We have…show more content…
“It is probably the same in the universe. God created things which had free will… if a thing is free to be good it is also free to be bad. And free will is what has made evil possible. Why then did God give them free will?” I agree with this concept, if something is a free to be a good it is also free to be bad. The reason why, is because we have the free will for free speech; which is a good thing. But it can also be a bad thing when it is abused. For instant, screaming “fire” in a crowded movie theater and there wasn’t any. Is free will being misused. However, the question why did God give them free will? Is something I do not disagree with. The reason that God is giving us free will is to test our faith. To see how much we can bare and handle. To see who have more control over themselves. God did not advise individuals to do harm or to have them portray the actions that they perform. It is the human itself. The only thing God is doing is watching over us and guiding us when asked

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