Relationships In Ernest Hemingway's The Hills Like White Elephants

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Internal Pressures of Relationships
It is human nature to show our emotions in the presence of our significant other. We seek them for support and devotion, as well as trust and loyalty. The problems that couples endure are ones that they should endure together and not without one another. In Ernest Hemingway’s story, “The Hills Like White Elephants,” the author shows us that there can be many internal conflicts with our closest companions that arise throughout the course of time while reading his story. And as time goes by, we tend subconsciously know that we have the excuse of only being human, we tend to neglect exactly how we have gotten ourselves into a situation that has negatively impacted our life with our significant others’. The troubles that are faced require a variety of responsibilities that couples generally need to apply to their problems in order to come out on top of a bad situation. In doing so, it allows us to feel
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“Doesn’t it mean anything to you,” she asks, implying to the American that he must think deeper than the surface to find the importance of not doing the operation versus going through with it. Unfortunately, we see that the American does not desire to have a baby in this moment but has a hard time clearly sharing his opinion to the girl. He beats around the bush; so to speak, and instead promises her that she can have the whole world once she does the operation (76). His main concern is sharing the lifestyle of traveling and experiencing all that the world has to offer while Jig is more concerned with what may or may not happen if the operation is done. She tries to communicate her view of the situation; however, the man implies that the pregnancy is “…the only thing that’s made [them] unhappy” and that they will “…be fine afterward,” as if nothing has happened (Hemingway
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