Religion In The Elizabethan Era Essay

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Religion in The Elizabethan Era About 450 years ago, the Elizabethan Era was in full swing. Religion was a was a touchy subject; with half the people believing in Protestantism, and the others believing in Catholicism. The monarch ruled politically and the roman catholic church ruled spiritually, until King Henry VIII broke away from the catholic church and created The Church of England. No separation from state and church created a religious battle field, and a constant swinging pendulum for religion. Protestantism, was brought to us by king henry VIII. King Henry VIII decided to part way from the catholic church when the pope denied his request to divorce his wife, and thus birth The Church of England. As the Church of England…show more content…
Tension started when King Henry VIII initiated the act to leave the catholic church, and create The church of England. The king then made himself head of the church which brought up problems with the catholic church. After King Henry died, his son Edward VI, took throne at age nine. Edward reigned as a powerful protestant king, He was a huge boost to the churches strength. King Edward VI did away with all the catholic statues, stained glass in the churches and introduce the common book of prayer. After King Edward died at age 15, his half sister, how was a diehard catholic, mary, took the throne (Life in Elizabethan days: 148). When Mary took throne, she was devoted to restoring catholicism in England(Life in Elizabethan days: 148). Mary burned over 300 protestant heretics and heresy, she also believed anyone believing or practicing any religion other than the one recognized by the crown was related to treason. After Mary, her sister Elizabeth took throne. Once again, Queen elizabeth swung england back to Protestantism. Unlike her siblings and father, Queen Elizabeth was lenient with practicing catholics, but she did make some specific laws that helped keep the Church of England strongly in its place. Throughout the next years, England had to adjust to the constant shift in religions, the fact that one year you may have a holiday, and a couple years that holiday wouldn’t exist on a
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