Religion In Uncle Tom's Cabin

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During the 1800s, America became split up into two groups: either proslavery or abolitionists. Before the Civil War, predominantly the North and South were against each other on whether or not there should be slavery. In 1852, Harriet Beecher Stowe published the controversial novel, Uncle Tom 's Cabin. It is said to that, "Uncle Tom 's Cabin is perhaps the most influential and iconic novel ever written by an American" (Reynolds). The book was a powerful source that gave the abolitionist movements the momentum they needed to gain more support from the Northerners. Soon after it was published, readers exposed and criticized Stowe for writing a novel that exposed southern slave owners and, what southerns thought to be, a wronged portrayal of…show more content…
Another common topic that is discussed throughout each book is religion. Each author uses religion, in different ways, to prove the overall purpose of their book. Stowe first writes about religion in saying, "Tom, ' says I to him, 'I trust you, because I think you 're a Christian -- I know you wouldn 't cheat" (Stowe, 44). From the very first chapter, the readers know that people view Tom as a Christian. It 's surprising to think of someone who has gone through slavery, yet still can have a faith in God. This gives the reader the interpretation that Tom doesn 't believe the Bible support slavery, because if it did he wouldn 't be so a Christian. Stowe uses pathos in this excerpt, especially when she makes the point that Tom 's owner knows Tom will come back. Not only does it make the readers realize that Tom is very loyal, it also shows how much power slave owners had over the slaves. The idea that Tom 's slaveowner trusts that this boy, Tom, will come back even when he has the chance to run away shows the amount of power the slaveowner has over Tom. Although Eastman writes about religion throughout her novel, she also uses the Bible to justify slavery: "A writer on Slavery has no difficulty in tracing back its origin. There is also the advantage of finding it, with its continued history, and the laws given by God to govern his own institution, in the Holy Bible" (Eastman, preface). In this quote, Eastman is making a point that completely contradicts Stowe 's…show more content…
Each author 's perception of the way a slave owner treats their slaves shows the different relationship of slaves and their owners in each novel. In Aunt Phillis 's Cabin, Eastman tries to show that slave owners treat their slaves well and with respect. In the scene where Bacchus is asking Mr. Weston if she can go to an event, Mr. Westin replies: "Well, I suppose I can 't refuse you, ' said Mr. Weston; 'but come home sober, or ask no more permissions" (Eastman, 34). It seems that Eastman included this scene to show that a slave owner treats their slaves with respect by giving them "permission" to do as they please. Eastman might 've included this to further her point that there 's a good relationship between slaves and their owners. Although looking at this scene from todays point of view, it seems so strange that a grown woman would have to ask permission to go to a barbecue. Stowe 's perception of the relationship between a slave and their master strongly differs from Eastman 's. Stowe writes about what happens when Jim Crow walks into the room and his master unnecessaryily throws raisons at him: "The child scampered, with all his little strength, after the prize, while his master laughed" (Stowe, 45). This view of the relationship is much different because the slave owner is taunting this little boy with raisons and continues to laugh at him. Stowe might have used this scene to expose how slave masters would take advantage and make fun of their
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