Responsibility In Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

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The responsibility of their death ultimately belongs to the families of each teenager; their opinions, and actions greatly influenced the decision of the two, ending their lives. “O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father, and refuse thy name; or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, And I’ll no longer be a Capulet” ( II.ii.36-39). Romeo and Juliet’s love was doomed from the beginning, because of the enmity between their families, this contributed to their death. This was seen as an act of rebellion, and they obviously blamed it on Romeo’s presence in Juliet’s life. In Act Three, Scene five, Juliet’s father Capulet speaks enormous hatred he has for Romeo, by calling him an opportunistic man, who has led his daughter astray…show more content…
“I was your mother much upon these years that you are now a maid. Thus in brief, the valiant Paris sought you for his love.” (I.iii.77-79) This put a lot of pressure on Juliet because the more she was being forced/pushed into getting married, the more she resented it. This made her somewhat depressed because she felt like her life was derailed. Romeo, the young Montague, was thinking about his ex girlfriend, Rosaline. He still had feelings for her. The young teenager needed advice, but Benvolio gave him a bad advice. He wanted to show to his cousin, Romeo, that even if you lost your love, there is still other women in the city. The message of Benvolio: you can still find love with someone else. His cousin, Benvolio, said “At this same ancient feast of Capulet’s sups the fair Rosaline whom thou so lovest, with all the admired beauties of Verona: go thither; and, with unattainted eye, compare her face with some that I shall show, and I will make thee think thy swan a crown” (I.ii. 359). The families of each teenagers should feel guilty about their death because they drove Romeo and Juliet by the pressure, they put on them.. Both families of each teenagers are responsible of their
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