Revelation Dbq

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Gabe Hatch Historical Context of D&C 121 Circumstances Surrounding how the Revelation was Received During this time that this revelation was given, Joseph Smith along with Alexander McRae, Caleb Baldwin, Lyman Wright, and Hyrum Smith, were incarcerated in Liberty Jail from December 1, 1838, to April 6, 1839 (Jessee & Welch, 2000; The Joesph Smith Papers, 1839; Wessel, 2012). These men all underwent extreme trails in terrible conditions, which Holland (2008) referred to as “cruel, illegal, and unjustified.” In the midst of these trials, Joseph wrote a four letters to his wife Emma, and another letter addressed to Bishop Edward Partridge, the saints at Quincy Illinois, and the saints abroad (Jessee & Welch, 2000). This letter was composed in…show more content…
For instance, and Joseph the saints were being held under the power of Governor Lilburn W. Boggs where they were declared enemies of the state (see Boggs, 1838; The Joesph Smith Papers, 1839). Further, Joseph, and those imprisoned with him, were surrounded by strong walls, felt like there were in hell surrounded by demons, were changed falsely, were guarded heavily, had wickedness and cruelty practiced upon them, driven from their homes, and smitten without cause (The Joesph Smith Papers, 1839). D&C 121 becoming Canonized Scripture Portions of the Liberty letter were first published in the 1876 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants (Wessel, 2012). Under the direction of Brigham Young, Orson Pratt organized the letter into what now is sections 121-123 of the Doctrine and Covenants. Lastly, the writing that now makes up sections 121-123 of the Doctrine and Covenants were first sustained as scripture at the October 1880 general conference of the church (Wessel, 2012). Doctrinal Discussion of D&C 121 The Prophetic…show more content…
For example, in D&C 121 Christ responds to Joseph after a heart-felt payer and mentions that Joseph’s sufferings are not yet comparable to those of Job (see verse 10). Further, within the actual letter, Joseph compares himself to Paul, Peter, Job, and Abraham, in that he is suffering for the sake of Christ. Wessel (2012) likens these comparisons to the Savior’s owns words: “Blessed are ye, when men shall… persecute you … rejoice, and be glad … for so persecuted they the prophets before you” (Matthew 5: 11-12). Showing Joseph’s wrongful incarceration was an affirmation of his prophetic identity (Wessel, 2012). Further, Joseph then connects himself to 2 Peter 1, by paraphrasing Peters words and using similar phrases in D&C 121 (Wessel,
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