Review Of Final Report Of The Truth And Reconciliation Commission Of Canada

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The "Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada" thoroughly reviews the unique laws held by each indigenous tribe, detailed on pages forty-five to eighty-one. Additionally, the report highlights the difference between Aboriginal and indigenous laws and how these laws have negatively impacted them. It also outlines Canada's efforts toward reconciliation with them. In the report, the author states that there is a difference between Aboriginal laws and Indigenous laws. Before Europeans came to North America, and met the indigenous people and assimilated them into their laws. The indigenous people had laws of their own. Indigenous laws were diverse, while Aboriginal laws were similar to the Canadian legal system. Indigenous …show more content…

"One of the most damaging consequences of residential schools has been that so many Survivors, their families, and whole communities have lost the connection to their own cultures, languages, and laws. on page forty-six, the author mentions, "The opportunity to learn, understand, and practise the laws of their ancestors as part of their heritage and birthright was taken away." The law significantly impacted Indigenous people, making it more difficult for them to accept reconciliation. The laws protected people from their wrongdoing and stripped away Indigenous laws. As the author stated on page forty-eight, "Decisions not to charge or prosecute abusers allowed people to escape the harmful consequences of their actions. In addition, the right of Aboriginal communities and leaders to function in accordance with their own customs, traditions, laws, and cultures was taken away by …show more content…

The author of this report discusses Canada's efforts to reconcile with indigenous nations and the challenges that came with it. Due to the many laws Canada has made that protect wrongdoers and abusers and hide the fact that the church had harmed generations of indigenous tribes in these residential schools. Indigenous and Aboriginal people do not trust the legal system of Canada. The author mentions that..." Failure to recognize such truths hinders reconciliation. Many Aboriginal people have a deep and abiding distrust of Canada's political and legal systems because of the damage they have caused." Therefore, the road to reconciliation was a tough one cause of the amount of trauma that the indigenous people went through and the lack of trust in the government system; they had all right not to want to reconcile with the

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