Revolution: Causes And Consequences Of The French Revolution

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Christopher Rouse World History French Revolution Essay The French Revolution, lasting from 1789-1799 this decade long event took place in 4 different stages. It 's first being famously titled the “National Assembly”, followed by the Legislative Assembly, the Directory, and finally the Napoleonic Era. Each stage holds key events that are notably turning points in this 10 year long fight, but to fully understand the Revolution, mainly its causes and consequences, and the reason why the “common” people started the fight in the first place we need to evaluate the 1st and last stages of the revolution. The National Assembly & The Napoleonic Era. When we study the French Revolution, we understand the meaning or in this case difference between a revolution and a war. A war is “a state of armed conflict between different nations or states or different groups within a nation or state” while a revolution is “a forcible overthrow of a government or social order in favor of a new system.”. Both have similar meanings and causes, such as anger towards a loss of land, or people. And this can be seen in the start of the National Assembly. The Common People of France united in response to France’s government deliberately starving their people, the government being in debt because of the American Revolution and many other costly wars causing and the main “trigger” of the revolution of France’s people going…show more content…
The Napoleonic era begins roughly with Napoleon Bonaparte 's coup d 'état, overthrowing the Directory (3rd stage), and establishing the French Consulate, and ends around the his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815. Afterwards The Congress of Vienna soon set out to restore Europe to pre-French Revolution days. The new leader, Napoleon brought stability France, from a major setback caused revolution and war. He achieved peace with the Roman Catholic Church and In 1804 Napoleon promulgated the Civil Code, a revised body of civil law, which also helped stabilize French
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