Revolutionary War Inevitable Analysis

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This war was inevitable. We all knew it. However, the extent of destruction, casualties and ruthless violence wasn’t anticipated. None of us could fathom what was occurring on this battlefield today, if we were told prior to this revolution. I was merely sixteen years of age and I enlisted for the war. “I’ve lived in oppression long enough.” “Now it is time I shall revolt from the chains that hold me together,” I thought to myself as I prudently approached the enlistment sheet. Liberty, Freedom. Feelings I have never felt nor experienced because of the authoritarian that controlled me. My family has paid exorbitant taxes, been ruled by nefarious tyrant and endured the burdens of immense disrespect. This shall stop here once and for all. I…show more content…
General Washington told us that we were greatly outnumbered and nothing could change that. “Numbers are trivial.” “They could have thousands of soldiers, and we could have a meager hundred, but that means absolutely nothing!” “Tactics, morale and bravery will result in our triumphant victory, not the amount of troops we have.” “God has bestowed many things upon you men.” “You gentlemen have dedication, commitment and dare I say a patriotic devotion for your country,” announced General Washington. I always had a deep admiration for prominent men endowed with a wealth of intellect and a distinguished soul. The reason is that my family consisted of so many of these eminent men. As a result I was used to being in their presence. However, Mr. Washington was distinct in his very own way. His rhetoric, intelligence, sense of humor and relentless perseverance was far beyond what I have seen. As a result, I wasn’t nearly as terrified as I wouldn’t been without his motivational guidance. But I digress. I was in a militia that consisted of 45 men. Among them, I was the youngest, but I was…show more content…
“They outnumber us and we already lost too many,” explained Peter. As I escaped oblivion and reached my senses once again, the words of Mr. Washington flooded into my mind. “They could have thousands of soldiers, and we could have a meager hundred, but that means absolutely nothing!” After recollecting his words I persisted on staying. “General Washington told us that the number of troops is insignificant.” “They are not the stronger force, we are!” “Relinquishing our freedom is what we have been doing all our lives.” “We must fight back,” I proclaimed. The words I uttered seemed to raise the morale in our remaining militia. We all picked our muskets up once again and the war commenced. I filled my gun with gunpowder and took the rod to make sure the bullet was in place. I gently cocked my musket and fired. The bullet struck one of the red coats and he fell to the ground, injured. Blood gushed out of his leg as he tried to manage his wound with a bandage. James tackled one of the red coats and used a rock to smash his face. He bashed the man’s face until the man turned
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