Rhetorical Analysis Of Abraham Lincoln's Speech

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Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister, activist, humanitarian, and leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King was widely known for his speech “ I Have A Dream”. Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States. Abraham was famous for his speech “Gettysburg Address”.Both are known for their great rhetoric skills and demand for freedom and equality. Their speeches are also ranked among the greatest in history. This topic will discuss the similarity between the rhetorical devices used and the purpose that the speeches were emanating. Abraham Lincoln begins his speech by stating "Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” Lincoln honored the Union dead and reminded the listeners that nobody's consider different which means everybody is equal. In…show more content…
begins “Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination.” As Dr. King though slavery might have ended, there is still inequality going on. Segregation still remains towards them, and their least opportunities they have. What Dr. King demanded was a change. He was tired of the unfair things that surrounded him. His dreams of blacks and whites coming together as one, and that one day “when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro
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