Rhetorical Analysis Of Frederick Douglass Speech

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Douglass announced his speech to a sympathetic audience hoping to inspire African Americans by explaining how United States treated them poorly while using common elements in his speech. Douglass’ overall goal was to rewrite history in how Americans see Blacks. Throughout the speech he used specific diction choices and related to his audience to create imagery. This speech did more than change how U.S. citizens see colored people but it redirect relationship between the North and the South for the better. Douglass was an eminent human rights leader in the anti-slavery movement and the first African-American citizen to hold a high U.S. government rank. First and Foremost, aspiration was needed for the several ethnic groups throughout the U.S mainly towards Blacks. It was morally wrong to…show more content…
These common elements were pathos and his use of tone throughout his speech. Douglass had first hand experience of how hard life was for an African American so it was quite detailed in gruesome causing blacks to realise how poorly they’ve been treated. The tone of Douglass speech was lively as the more it went on the more impassioned showed. Douglass not only changed history nut he saved thousands of African American lives and futures. To conclude, Douglass gave colored people a dream where everyone lived together equally from his ability to convince his audience that there is hope for his race. Douglass was a man needed during his time, who could inspire any crowd for the better. He was born into slavery and separated from his mother when he was an infant so he is more than experienced to know the hardships of being black. If it wasn’t for Douglass history might of been different for not just blacks but every ethnic group. Douglass is one of if not the most important inspirational leaders of the United States history ever
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