Rhetorical Analysis Of Lincoln's Political Speech By Abraham Lincoln

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SEGUNDA PEC MUNDOS ANGLÓFONOS. ABRAHAM LINCOLN GETTYSBURG ADDRESS 1863. MARÍA DEL MAR VIDAL VIÑA 26/03/2015 This is a political speech given by Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War in Gettysburg ( Pensilvania ) on 19 of November in 1863, four and a half month after the Gettisburg Battle. Abraham Lincoln became the United States' 16th President in 1861, issuing the Emancipation Proclamation that declared forever free those slaves within the Confederacy in 1863. Lincoln believed that secession was illegal, and was willing to use force to defend Federal law and the Union. When Confederate batteries fired on Fort Sumter and forced its surrender, he called on the states for 75,000 volunteers. Four more slave states joined the…show more content…
Two copies apparently were written before delivering the speech, one of which probably was the reading copy. The remaining ones were produced months later for soldier benefit events. Despite widely-circulated stories to the contrary, the president did not dash off a copy aboard a train to Gettysburg. Lincoln carefully prepared his major speeches in advance; his steady, even script in every manuscript is consistent with a firm writing surface, not the notoriously bumpy Civil War-era trains. Additional versions of the speech appeared in newspapers of the era, feeding modern-day confusion about the authoritative text. It´s strength and it´s feelings have make it into the speech of the U.S.A reestablish. In 1863 The United Stated were divided into a bloody Civil War between the North States (The Union) and The States of the South (The confederation). The issue was the abolition or not of the Slavery. The president was in favor of the abolition of the slavery. This speech is a kind of exhortation to his nation. In it, Lincoln encourages his compatriots to continue with the war in order to save the union with the aim that the dead in this battle (about 43.000 in both sides) had some
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