Rhetorical Analysis Of President Obama's Moral Speech By Barack Obama

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“Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real, they are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this America: They will be met” (Obama). On January 20, 2009, former President Barack Obama stood at Capitol Hill and delivered his inaugural speech, in front of 1.8 million citizens, beginning his stint as the 44th President of the United States. During his speech, Obama claims the problems facing Americans as well as setting a notion explaining how he will solve the problems. Obama builds his credibility with personal facts and reputable history, making Americans trust his approach. President Obama uses a fine mix of ethos, pathos, and logos to not only speak to the citizens of America, but leaders and residents of other abiding nations that there is an assortment of challenges in America that can and will be resolved due to the determination, persistent dedication, and morale of Americans. Instead of individualism, Obama focuses on emphasizing the unity of the nation being one again. He does this by refraining from using words like ‘me’, ‘myself’,…show more content…
Obama strikes the audience’s attention as well as emotion by grasping this concept through his use of pathos. With his understanding of knowledge on the history of America, Obama knows the hardships and struggles that Americans faced to achieve the American Dream. America is the place people live out their dreams and have the freedom to do what they want. A place people have life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and Obama recognizes this. “…to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.” Obama recognizes these liberties and achievements that Americans hold so dearly—so close to their
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