Rhetorical Analysis Of Richard M. Nixon's Speech

1013 Words5 Pages
In an epic political move, a young Senator from California, Richard M. Nixon, took to the television, to apologetically address the accusations that he was using campaign donations for personal expenses. His speech is significant in that he brought to light his theory of being honest and straight forward, as well as, proving that money is not always needed in being successful. Nixon changed the way politicians in America preached their ideas, concerns, and platforms. Through a brilliant speech, reaching over sixty million Americans, which is now known to all as the 'Checkers ' speech, Nixon went live and blatantly informed the American people of his life 's expenses, argued that public office candidates should not have to be wealthy in…show more content…
Money cannot always buy votes. Nixon’s sacrifice for his country, incredible work ethic, and the strength he exemplified when he delivered his speech, proved to pull peoples’ attention when he was elected Vice President. He introduced a valid argument about what it takes to be a President, when he stated, “that it’s essential in this country of ours that a man of modest means can also run for President” (Nixon). Wealth does not define a person’s values, beliefs or character. Nixon was able to integrate this into the situation by speaking directly to the common people. Nixon used his own financial problems, and in a sense, made it relatable to sixty million Americans. He exemplified that he cared more about their opinion of his character than the amount of money he had. The approach he used to deliver his flaws was inspiring because he never let a few financial problems keep him from accomplishing his goals. A man who can bare his life before a significantly large audience would gain much more respect than a man who inherited his father’s money and believed that only the wealthy folk could be successful in…show more content…
Overall, Nixon faced his accusations with strength and honesty. He laid out a detailed script of his financial crises and proved that he was not using the campaign money inappropriately. In his speech to the common people, Nixon exemplified his theory of telling the truth, and demonstrated that wealth is not always the answer to success. He was a determined individual and worked his way to the top. Nixon went straight to the common people and showed that he cared more about their opinion of his character than other wealthy politicians. Remarkably this speech has had such historical significance because it marked the beginning of American politics beginning played out on television. To this day, when a politician makes an emotional speech, it 's often called a 'Checkers '

More about Rhetorical Analysis Of Richard M. Nixon's Speech

Open Document