Rhetorical Analysis: The Cape Wind Project

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With green energy supplying electricity to more than 14% of American homes, there is no doubt that it is a worthwhile endeavor.., Though highly contested, the Cape Wind Project, proposes a wind farm to be constructed off the coast of Cape Cod. The Harvard-educated Robert F. Kennedy Jr., an opponent of the project, expresses his doubts and criticisms of the project in his op-ed column printed in the New York Times, “An Ill Wind Off Cape Cod” which he composed when he first heard that the company Energy Management is trying to build a wind farm on Nantucket Sound. He utilizes a genuine tone in order to get his thoughts across. Francis Broadhurst, a proponent of the Cape Wind Project and distinguished writer, writes “Cape Wind Is Sound for…show more content…
Broadhurst still incorporated solid pathos into his article. For example, he utilized pride of his state Massachusetts, while using a sincere tone, he asserted that the wind farm was an “opportunity to put Massachusetts on the map”. In addition, he states that “Local residents would stand to benefit greatly from the cape wind project through a fixed price deal where electricity rates would remain the same”, which invokes emotion as electricity prices typically increase. Furthermore, Broadhurst also contends the wind farm will lead to the “Cape wind project can supply out short term needs and lay the foundation for the coming of deep water wind”, showing that the farm can be a huge boon to the development of projects such as a deep water wind farm. He also asserts that it will help in the present by bolstering the economy, which clearly appeals to pathos. Kennedy distinguishes his article from that of Broadhurst by utilizing a plethora of potent pathos. For instance, he clearly appeals to emotions when he contends that the wind farm is very capable of injuring and killing small animals and birds, which would evidently evoke a potent emotional response and highlighting a sizable negative. He also appeals very specifically to his audience by asserting that the wind farm would strongly affect small family businesses and that closing the channel to the Cape would affect ferries,…show more content…
But once again, Kennedy did the better job. While Broadhurst’s fact based and logos driven essay is effective, Kennedy’s more pathos-driven essay persuades better. For example, Kennedy uses very potent imagery in his article. Particularly, some instances include when he describes the Cape as having "Endless dune-covered beaches” to make his audience rethink supporting wind farms if they destroy those beautiful beaches. Another instance was when he asserts that the "the whirling turbines could every year kill thousands of migrating songbirds and sea ducks” which has the dual purpose of refuting Broadhurst’s point that the wind farm will not kill any bird and really persuades the reader that the wind farm is detrimental if it will cause the death of wildlife. In addition to imagery, Kennedy also employs repetition of the words us and we in order to bring a sense of alliance against the wind farm, and to include himself as well. A final point is that Kennedy utilizes powerful anaphora. For example, he asserts “I wouldn't build… Nor would I build…”, which show that he is building up his ideas and showing the audience what he believes in and criticizing his critics and presenting the extent of his knowledge of wind farms . Another example of anaphora in which a condemnatory tone is used is when “I (he) invite (invites) these critics… I (he) urge (urges) them to…”
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