Rhetorical Devices In The Gettysburg Address

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During the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln faced the challenge of fusing two opposing sides into a unified America once again. Despite the bloody battles and fierce beliefs of both sides, President Abraham Lincoln solemnly carries out his purpose, to honor fallen soldiers in his speech, The Gettysburg Address, without staking blame or resentment towards either side. With an honorary and prideful tone created by repetition, allusion, and patriotic word choice, Lincoln persuades the people of America to adopt the goal of abolishing slavery under the guise of honoring soldiers. To first introduce his rhetoric, Lincoln opens with an allusion to the Declaration of Independence. Lincoln declares that this longstanding document created by the founding fathers instilled that “all men are created equal” (Qtd. in Lincoln). This document has always been a source of pride and hope for Americans, as in the beginning, it was used to separate from a tyrannical, oppressive leader, and even today, Americans celebrate its publishing every Fourth of July. Lincoln alludes to this document in order to justify his condemnation of slavery, as slavery contradicts the founding fathers’ message of equality. He also implies that his opposition, the Confederacy, is similarly oppressive in its…show more content…
These words, used six times in his brief speech, holds power in the meaning it adds to the soldiers’ deaths. The use of dedicate in all contexts implies purpose and motivation; simultaneously, it ties together the purpose for which the soldiers’ fought to the aspirations Lincoln supplies for his audience to adopt. Once again, while invoking respect from the audience, he demonstrates his own respect for the soldiers and solidifying his honorary tone. This repetition also serves to create remembrance in the listeners’ minds, for if they remember the dedication of the soldiers daily, they will also work to achieve their
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