Robert Sternberg's Theory: The Triarchic Theory Of Intelligence

1542 Words7 Pages
Intelligence is defined as the ability to acquire, use and understand knowledge. Intelligence refers to the cognitive abilities of an individual to understand complex concepts, learn from various experiences, to reason well and to cope effectively with the demands of daily living. Intelligence has been the subject of intense study since the development of the science of pyschology and there are many different and varied views about it. Pyschologists still have no agreements on how many different kinds of intellectual abilities exist. Psychologists believe that instead of trying to answer the question, we need to understand the basic cogintive process underlying intelligence. We can divide the theorists who study intelligence in two different…show more content…
Robert Sternbeg (1997) proposed a new model of intelligence which is called the triarchic theory of intelligence. This model consists of a) Analytical intelligence or the ability to breakdown a problem or a situation into components. b) Creative intelligence that is the ability to deal with novelty. C) Practical intelligence which is also kwnon as ‘Common Sense” or “street smartness”. It is this understanding that the public understands and values but it is lacking in standard intelligence tests. In a problem solving study using novel forms of analogies, Sternberg (1981) found that a higher level of intelligence is associated with spending relatively more time on global or higher order planning and relatively less time on local or lower order planning for…show more content…
To know for the broad range of achievements in today’s modern society, Howard Gardener proposes the “existence of a number of relatively autonomous intellectual capacities”, he calls them as multiple intelligences. They are as follows-Linguistic intelligence, musical intelligence, logical intelligence, visual intelligence, kinesthetic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, existential and naturalist. The savant pheonomenon provides a support for the existence of separate intelligenice. A savant is a mentally deficient individual who has a highly developed talent in one area which is rapid calculation, memory, music or art. Eg. the extraordinary case of Leslie Lemke, who was born blind with cerebral palsy and mental retardation. Inspite of disabilities, Leslie became enamoured of the piano and showed mastery at picking out melodies on it. Recently Garderner (1998) has added three more different types of intelligence which are naturalistic intelligence as in the case of Charles Darwin, spiritual intricate pieces of Piano. Both these students show clear signs of intelligence and they might score low on an IQ test. Savants like Kim peek have even more extreme intellectual strengths and weaknesses. Such observations have convinced many psychologists that its time to put forth new, broader definitions of
Open Document