Robin Hood Case Study

1244 Words5 Pages
1. What problems does Robin Hood have? What issues need to be addressed? The first problem Robin Hood appears to have is the Sheriff. One can gather from the first few sentences that Sheriff Nottingham is running for re-election and Robin Hood is not a fan. Hood and Nottingham have had previous altercations which then turned into a personal fiasco. His second problem is gathering crew members to “overthrow” or rebel against the sheriff. After putting a crew together, he must then train them to be as strict and precise as he would like. Each member of the crew, known as the “Merrymen” will have their own distinct duty. Hood’s next issue, one he would not have foreseen, the growth of the crew. It grew so large he could not control the members…show more content…
Unity of Command – Hood was the supreme, making all important decisions. Next would come his Lieutenants, who could make decisions that would make much less of an impact, and then just the regular Merrymen who were typically only in charge of themselves. Hood resembled a Dictator. Picture an individual who tells you what to do, when to do it, and how to do it. One could not stray from the path as that may result in disciplinarian action. c. Centralization – Hood was the main man. He did not take orders from anybody, but rather he gave them. This worked well when the band was small, however, when the band began to grow, he became a stranger to his own crew. Centralization only works well for so long, and then, as you see here, it will fail. d. Discipline – Hood was strict about the way his Merrymen acted. Should any of them act out, he was quick to correct them. Actually, Little John was in charge of keeping law and order throughout the group. Should Little John need any assistance of not get the right response when correcting them, I am sure Hood is right there to take…show more content…
Physiological – if the crew were not stealing from the rich to provide for their own group, these needs would be unmet. Safety – Will Scarlett was in charge of being a lookout for the gang, a prime example of being safe. Esteem – Hood is all about feathers in his hat. He loves to be in control and having the final say in each situation. His position in the gang allows him to have an inflated self-esteem. Self-Actualization – in the beginning Hood was encouraged to grow his crew as much as he possibly could. The Expectancy Theory is also a great theory to encourage the motivation here. When his crew members knew exactly what he was expecting, they were encouraged to complete that goal. As he trained them in the beginning, he was informing them of how he wanted the crew to be ran. The theories listed above would make a huge impact on the outcome of Hood’s
Open Document