Romeo And Juliet Aggression Quotes

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Romeo and Juliet Progressive Essay In the story of The Three Little Pigs, the pigs feared for their lives as the Big Bad Wolf came approaching. The Big Bad Wolf, being very aggressive, blew the first two little pig’s houses down, without thinking about the consequences. Little did he know that the third pig, using not only impulse, but also intuition, built a house made of bricks. Many fables and fairytales like this have shown characters with aggressive behavior. Likewise, the character Tybalt, in Romeo and Juliet, acts pugnaciously and violently throughout the story, not taking a second to ponder the decision he has made. Often times, being one who starts quarrels in the streets of Verona, Tybalt demonstrates numerous times in the play that …show more content…

Look upon thy death!” (1.1.733). Tybalt’s rage is evident in this scene – mentioning death is a clear example of how he will stop at nothing to destroy the Montagues. This also displays Tybalt acting in a combative manner because he wants to start a fight instantly upon seeing Benvolio, a Montague, appear. This reflects a lack of control and strong aggression on Tybalt’s part. Furthermore, when Tybalt discovers that the Montagues have barged in, uninvited to his uncle’s party, he ferociously remarks, “This, by his voice, should be a Montague!/Fetch me my rapier, boy. What, dares the slave/Come hither covered with an antic face,/To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?/Now, by the stock and honor of my kin/To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin!” (1.5.750-751). This makes it evident that Tybalt thinks that the Montagues should be killed, and that he wouldn’t feel it to be wrong if he went and killed the Montagues …show more content…

Tybalt, ready with his sword, thrusts it towards Romeo and attempts to slay him. He blatantly disobeyed Capulet’s orders and provoked Romeo. By provoking Romeo, he sparked a violent duel, which led to his own demise. In addition, Tybalt’s pugnacity and quarrelsome behavior lingers even after his death in the play. At the end of the play, after drinking the poison, Romeo utters the words, “Thus with a kiss I die,” (5.3.120). If Tybalt had not been pugnacious and killed Mercutio, then the duel between Romeo and him would not have happened. His ferocious attitude caused Romeo’s banishment from Verona. The location of Romeo was the key factor in the misunderstanding of Juliet’s death. Thus, Tybalt’s quarrelsome and disputatious behavior or violence is proven to persist in the play, and is evidently his tragic

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