Romeo And Juliet Celestial Imagery Analysis

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William Shakespeare consistently uses language that displays celestial imagery in order to explore enduring themes such as love, loss, destiny and vengeance throughout his classic play Romeo and Juliet. The uses of imagery that Romeo uses bequeath not only the idea of fate, but meaningful symbols and metaphors to successfully convey the despair that the lover’s face in a way that we ourselves can feel their lust as well as their anguish. Throughout the play, Shakespeare uses imagery to portray the adoration and love Romeo has for Juliet using language to compare her to all that illuminates. Here Romeo professes, Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they return.…show more content…
The use of light is in essence a synonym of her beauty. Shakespeare’s decision to use celestial imagery within Romeo’s dialogues is genius as it is able to pass off meaningful symbolism in a way that is not only clear but salient to the text itself. Romeo’s monologue before Juliet’s window, allows us to visualize Juliet’s beauty as Romeo metaphorically compares her to the rising sun.
But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
(2.2.4-5)
This is one of the best examples of the use of light and dark imagery, as Shakespeare creates a visual picture to compare Juliet’s beauty to the light of the sun, but it also symbolizes the lover’s plight to remain together. Though they love each other so deeply, Juliet is the sun while Romeo is the moon; their fate enables them to be together briefly just as the celestial objects are only to meet at dawn and dusk successfully portraying their love. Romeo continues the inference of Juliet’s eyes to that of the light and beauty of the brightest of stars, when he states, "Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they
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