Romeo And Juliet Human Nature Analysis

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There is no physical person responsible for the deaths in Romeo and Juliet; instead, the deaths lie responsible within the physical aspects of human nature. Nature’s facets are responsible for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet in the tragedy. These facets, such as personal cognitive thoughts and emotions, are present within many of the retellings of actuality and reason within the play. Romeo’s emotions bloom quickly throughout his relationship with Juliet to a poisonous level, and these emotions commend him to pursue and commit suicide: “he writes that he did buy a poison…[and] came to this vault to die and lie with Juliet” (V. iii. 288-290). This confession Romeo writes in his letter to Friar Lawrence shows how his distraught beliefs led him to his unneeded death. Emotions such as this are a common aspect of human nature and can often lead to an unexpected outcome. Similar to the character of emotion, sickness and poor health often imposes to be a fatal flaw. This flaw is described in the account of Friar John: “suspecting that we both were in a house/ Where the infectious pestilence did reign,/ Sealed up the doors and would not let us forth./ So that my speed to Mantua there was stayed” (V. ii. 9-12). Due to the sickness being in the vicinity of Friar John, the message informing Romeo about…show more content…
These quick, not thought out actions can be very detrimental to its executer. Juliet presents this characteristic before she enacts her suicide: “Go, get thee hence, for I will not away/… /Yea, noise? Then I’ll be brief. O happy dagger,/ This is thy sheath” (V. iii. 160; 169-170). Juliet did not take the time to justify the correct action of the situation that was presented to her. She only thinks about her sudden grief and proclaims to take her life rather than living. This absence of thought and impulsiveness are perilous and can lead to harsh
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