Romeo And Juliet's Relationship With Parents

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Intro: Do you believe your parental relationships burden your chance to feel independent? Are you constantly arguing with your parents? Teenagers face many challenges in their lives from their romantic relationships, to violence, to drug abuse, but teens’ most difficult challenge of all is their relationship with their parents. Parents set certain expectations for their children to fulfill since they are the ones who raised the children. These expectations and the teen’s urge to be independent may stress the teens which will create conflicts and arguments within the relationships. P1:(Romeo and Juliet) The root of many strenuous teen problems can be traced back to ideas, rules, or expectations set by parents. This principle has stood the…show more content…
In the play, Romeo is going through a state of depression that no one knows the cause of. While talking to Romeo’s friend and cousin, Romeo’s father states, “Both by myself and many other friends. But he, his own affections ' counselor, Is to himself—I will not say how true, But to himself so secret and so close, So far from sounding and discovery” (1.1.138 - 140). Although they have tried to help, Romeo does not feel comfortable talking to his parents. He is not close enough with them to talk about Rosaline and is definitely not willing to tell them about Juliet. This lack of communication causes Romeo to stay depressed and later figure out his relationship problems on his own. It was an issue because he didn’t really know how to deal with Tybalt, Juliet’s cousin. At this time, he was only aided by his friends who were clueless about the relationship and with the friar who could not do much about the feud that kept Romeo and Juliet apart. The lack of parental support can be traced as the initial cause of the teenager’s woes and is seen…show more content…
Parents show signs of distrust towards their children by asking simple, yet displeasing questions such as, “Make sure you don’t forget your lunch at home.” According to the article, Teens and Parents in Conflict, by author Terri Apter, Ph.D., “A parent asks a checking-up question, and the teen feels like a little child again” (Terri Apter, Ph.D., paragraph 6). Those questions pull a trigger in the teen’s brain that stimulates the thought that they are not independent and will always need additional help from their parents even if they have grown past that stage. This thought causes teenagers to express their feelings in unhealthy ways, stating that they do not need any more help since now they are now an adult. The teenager will not be able to explore his or her own life because of the fear that the parents grind in their brain, which is the fear of not being able to survive without their parents’ advice. Later in the article, Apter, Ph.D. also states, “The arguments can put the entire family into a spin as each parent has a different interpretation of "the problem", and siblings complain that their parents are "dense" as they fail to understand the teen 's outbursts” (Terri Apter, Ph.D., paragraph 9). In context, many of the parent-children arguments can and will lead to an unhappy ending for all. The parents do not see the children’s struggles, which will
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