Rosa Parks Significance

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with fear as the reason for her relative fearlessness in deciding to appeal her conviction during the bus boycott. Four days after the Rosa Parks arrest African Americans boycotted the Montgomery bus. In the year of the boycott, Rosa Parks traveled around the world raising awareness and funds for the movement (boycott). Also she is called the mother of the civil rights movement. Problems were that throughout her childhood because of her appearance she was a target for racial discrimination (Racial discrimination refers to discrimination against individuals on the basis of their race.). The Alabama State College was influenced by Mrs Parks. The resources she needed was the fellow african americans to boycott and give her funds to support…show more content…
There were cases of flogging and murder. “We didn’t seem to have too many successes” says Rosa Parks, “It was more of a matter of trying to challenge the powers that be and to let it be known that we did not wish to continue being second class citizens.” Says Rosa Parks to her working with the NAACP. She faced harassment as a result of being with the boycott and resistance of the bus driver who told her to move, because she was an African American. The wpc had a meeting with Mayor W. A. Gayle in March 1954, the council's members outlined the changes they sought for Montgomery’s bus system. “No one standing over empty seats, a decree that black individuals not to made to pay at the front of the bus and enter from the rear and a policy that would require buses to stop at every corner in black residential areas”. When the meeting failed to produce any meaningful change, WPC president Jo Ann Robinson the council’s requests in a 21 May letter to Mayor Gayle telling him, ‘‘there has been talk from twenty-five or more local organizations of planning a city-wide boycott of busses”. A year after the WPC’s meeting with Mayor Gayle a 15-year-old named Claudette Colvin was arrested for challenging segregation on a Montgomery…show more content…
That afternoon, the city’s ministers and leaders met to discuss the possibility of extending the boycott into a long-term campaign. During this meeting the MIA was formed and King was elected president. Parks recalled “The advantage of having Dr. King as president was that he was so new to Montgomery and to civil rights work that he hadn’t been there long enough to make any strong friends or enemies’’. Meanwhile after securing bail for Parks with Clifford and Virginia Durr, E. D. Nixon, past leader of the Montgomery chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) began to call local black leaders including Ralph Abernathy and King to organize a planning meeting. On December 2 black ministers and leaders met at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church and agreed to publicize the planned December 5 boycott. The planned protest received unexpected publicity in the weekend newspapers and in radio and television reports. In early 1956 the homes of Martin Luther King and E. D. Nixon were bombed. Martin Luther King was able to calm the crowd that gathered at his home by saying ‘‘Be calm as I and my family are. We are not hurt and remember that if anything happens to me, there will be others to take my
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