Rowntrees Influencing Social Reforms

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It will be argued that the investigations of Booth and Rowntree were of greatest importance in influencing reforms as they highlighted the problems within society and revealed the shocking statistics, these statistics in turn influenced the new liberals to pass reform. National efficency and security however were of lesser importance as without the new liberals no reforms would have been passed and the leassiez-faire attitide continued. New liberals were of moderate importance in influencing social reforms between 1906-1914. Old liberalism believed that people should have freedom from the control of the government (leading to the leassiez-faire attitude toward the poor). In the 1905 election, the liberals were voted into power under prime…show more content…
Their investigation showed indisputable evidence that the people of Britain could not avoid or escape the poverty they were being pulled into. Booth and Rowntree were responsible in showeing politicians that the Laissez-faire view of poverty is nolonger acceptable and that the government would have to address this plauge of society. Charles Booth and Benjamin Rowntree challenged the existing views and stigma surrounding the poverty stricken of society. Booths research found that 30% of London 's population loved in ectreme poverty. Between 1891 and 1903, booth investigated all of London and publishd his statistical findings in his book "Labour and Life of The People" (1889). Booth concluded that poverty was such a deeo ussue that only the government would be able to solve. Inspired by Booth, Rowntree conducted an investigation to see if poverty was only a major probrem in London. After further research Rowntree concluded that poverty was a nation wide issue. Rowntree found that in the city of York, 30% faced extream poverty. Rowntree later publushed his findings in his book "Poverty, A Study of Town Life" (1901). Although Booth and Rowntree changed existing beliefs among politicians, there was so imediate action taken to help the poor. However, it…show more content…
Britain had control of most of south africa, but there were dutch settlers who had been in south africa longer than britain and refused to allow britain to control the whole country. The dutch settlers fought well and were defeating the Brittish army. Britain would have to resort to volunteers to send to fight in the Boer war. Concerns started to grow when 25% of volunteers were rejected because they were physically unfit to fight in the army (bearing in mind the standards at which you had to meet to join were relitavly low). Industrial cities had higher rates of volunteers. The govern,ent realised that of the small, unorginised Boer 's could defeat British soldiers, another more powerful enemy could pose a greater threat. An independant committee on Physical Deterioration was created to investigate this problem in England and Wales, while a royal commission examined Scotland. The results published in 1904 reccomended improving diet and reducing overcrowding. To do this liberals introduced free school meals and mandatory medical examinations for school children in the Education Act of 1906. National security was one of the governments primary concerns, clearly more important that the welfare of the British people. However, influence of New liberals was of more importance as without them none of these acts would ever
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