Rudyard Kipling's Rikking-Tikki-Tavi

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Rudyard Kipling’s captivating “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” became an addition to his multitude of children’s tales vastly known as The Jungle Book in 1895. The enchanting story collection most view as a classic has yet to lose its prevalent admiration to all audiences. The accumulating volumes are set in disparate scenes of colonial India during the period of British Imperialism. Kipling writes of a mongoose named Rikki-Tikki-Tavi and his battles between the two king cobra snakes that dominate the garden of his new home. Throughout the entire story, the reader endures an adrenaline rush from the fervent plot line of the anthropomorphic narrative. “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” is an unmatched story due to Kipling’s ability to avail incomparable literary devices…show more content…
Comparable to most children 's stories, Kipling strives to portray the central message that good unfailingly prevails when competing against evil. Tamara Fernando refers to “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” in the Criticism portion of Short Stories for Students as, “a straightforward tale in which the game hero and villains are clearly defined and good triumphs over evil” (Fernando 265). The themes of courage and loyalty intertwine to explicate the thesis. The author utilizes the two essential traits of Rikki, courage and loyalty, to emphasize his morally intact nature that enables his appointing as the story’s hero. Kipling commences the story by describing Rikki Tikki’s revival after an English family rescues him. Out of gratitude, Rikki serves as their protector from the snakes lurking within their bungalow’s garden. Despite the unfamiliarity of his mongoose heritage, Rikki indisputably remains loyal to his position and gallantly perseveres when in…show more content…
In Short Stories for Students, Ira Mark Milne explains, “An epithet is an adjectival phrase attributed as a title to a character, focusing on a specific characteristic: for example, in Greek Mythology, the goddess Athena is often referred to as ‘Grey-Eyed Athena’” (Milne 262). This example is quite similar to Kipling referring to Rikki as “Red-Eye” in “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi”. This device superbly relates the other elements to one another and remains exceedingly uncredited. Although epithets are brief words or phrases that readers simply tend to overlook, they perform many responsibilities, especially in “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi”. The epithets further intensify the theme of courage as they aid in depicting Rikki as a legend. Deryck Lodrick writes in “Man and Mongoose in Indian Culture” that the story “[. . .] has given rise to many popular misconceptions concerning mongooses and their ability to kill snakes” (Lodrick 192). Kipling produces these misinterpretations by forming unrealistic expectations for the reader through Rikki Tikki. Although Kipling grants Rikki’s character with the innate abilities of a mongoose, Kipling also dilinates Rikki-Tikki as an unequaled mongoose to appear almost immortal. It assists in creating a view of honor about Rikki-Tikki for the reader. As Rikki-Tikki is looking for Nagaina to put a halt to the conflict, he requests Darzee’s assistance and his response
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