Sacrifice In Tomorrow's Child By Ray Bradbury

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Ray Bradbury’s “Tomorrow’s Child” narrates the tale of Peter and Polly Horn, and their blue, pyramidal newborn “Py” from the fourth dimension. Despite Py having the aforementioned abnormalities, Peter and Polly developed an attachment to him and conceded their ordinary lives to accompany him in the fourth dimension. However, before this connection and sacrifice occurred, Polly struggled internally to accept Py, as he was as she and Peter wanted Py in their dimension. Polly swiftly entered a depressive state after Py was born, but with the assistance of her husband and Dr. Wolcott, she was finally able to accept Py as her own son and find contentment. By utilizing a theme of unconditional parental love and sacrifice; describing conflicts involving…show more content…
The development of Polly as a mother to Py assists in strengthening the theme of “Tomorrow’s Child.” At first, Polly found it challenging to consider Py as her own child; however, she strove to be sanguine and care for him as if he was human. “‘He 's not so bad, you know,’ she said. ‘Once you get to know him. I can even—hold him in my arms. He 's warm and he cries and he even needs his triangular diapers’” (Bradbury 5). In spite of her efforts to care for Py and adore him with all her heart, the stress became overmuch and she went off the deep end, drinking and smoking, but still caring for Py. “It was Py this and Py that, but somehow with some reserve, and sometimes she would look around the room and touch herself, and her hands would clench, and she would look lost and afraid, as if she were waiting for someone to arrive” (Bradbury 8). Even in her weakest moments, she attempted to find a way to embrace Py as he was. Nonetheless, Peter eventually had to snap her out of a breakdown and escort her to Dr. Wolcott, who informed the couple that he could bring them to the fourth dimension. Knowing that she could finally see her child as a human baby, Polly was able to obtain satisfaction and prove her unconditional love for Py by giving up her current life to accompany him. “A living, pink-faced, blue-eyed boy, lying in her arms, gasping and blinking and crying. The pyramidal shape was gone. Polly was crying with happiness” (Bradbury 14). Polly’s development as Py’s…show more content…
In the short story “Tomorrow’s Child,” Ray Bradbury describes the lives of Peter and Polly Horn, and their newborn son Py. Although Py was blue and shaped like a pyramid, Peter and Polly accepted him as their son; furthermore, their love for Py was so unyielding that they decided to venture to the fourth dimension in order to be with him. However, Polly originally found difficulty in calling a blue pyramid her son and wanted Py to emerge out of the fourth dimension. Polly quickly spiraled into anguish and, if not for her husband and Dr. Wolcott, may have never accepted Py as her son. Bradbury illustrates the story of Py, Polly, and Peter by establishing the theme of parental attachment and relinquishment, showing internal and external conflicts, and having Polly develop over the course of the
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