Sandro Botticelli Venus And Mars

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Venus and Mars is a c. 1485 Italian Renaissance oil painting, created by Florentine artist Sandro Botticelli. This painting depicts the meaning of love, exhibiting themes of traditional romanticism. It is understood that Botticelli’s Venus and Mars implies the message, love conquers war or perhaps that love conquers all. Mars, the god of war, was one of Venus, the goddess of Love’s many illicit lovers. Pictured, are both mythological Roman gods, in a tale of attraction, bravery, and an adulterous affair. This classical antiquity will be examined in detail, through visual observations of the three key elements: composition, style, and iconography. Botticelli illustrates the goddess Venus, in a sophisticated and voluptuous manner, whilst incorporating…show more content…
Gods, and goddesses were painted with objects, enabling audiences to identify them, and the part of their legend that artworks depict. Botticelli, was among early Renaissance artists, who combined symbols, to create complex tales within pieces of art. Venus and Mars, is a classic painting for highlighting iconography. Here, Mars can be viewed with features which correlate with the myths of the Greek god of war, Ares. For example, a lance and armour is theatrically placed around him. Cheekily, the satyrs in this image, have stolen Mars’ lance. Botticelli most likely added this detail comically, to express that Mars is now disarmed. The atmosphere of this painting also exhibits iconography. Perhaps, the woodland is symbolic of the garden of the Greek goddess of love, Aphrodite. There is a myrtle tree in the background, which is likewise associated with Venus. Also, in Greek Mythology, satyrs were mythological creatures who dwelled in woodlands and were passionately doting of youthful women. Satyrs were exclusively attracted to Nymphs with gentle and beautiful nature…show more content…
However, Mars is viewed slumbering the 'little death ', which is a state of weakening of consciousness where the sensation of orgasm is compared to death. In this setting, Mars’ slumber is possibly subsequent to making love with Venus. It is evident Mars is deeply unconscious, as not even a trumpet in his ear will wake him. Humorously Botticelli also added wasps above Mars’ head, and they too have not stirred him. Botticelli wrote the Italian word ‘vespé’ on the top right corner of the painting, which translates as ‘the wasps’. Conceivably, this phrase may be grasped as, the stings of illicit love. Forbidden love, is a reoccurring theme in the story of Venus and Mars. Their adulterous affair, is met with the company of satyrs who mythically are much more evil than they appear, and were likely included to reiterate that the act of illicit love is being observed. Overall, Botticelli painted a humorous, charming and timeless depiction of Venus and Mars. He strikes at our humanity, through giving godly characters a tale which is relatable to our own lives. No matter how much or how little one may know about the story of Venus and Mars or Botticelli himself, one can still be enlightened by the creative wit presented in this piece of art. The theme of the power of love overwhelms the concepts of what is illicit. Botticelli intertwines both the contemporary with the classicism. This
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