Satire In The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

1918 Words8 Pages
During the Victorian Era, there was inequality between the men and women. Men were the head of the household, the protector of the family, the dominant financial supporter, and the brave. On the other hand, women were identified as to take care of the house and the kids, quiet, shy, obedient, and to never show aggression. Both genders lived different lives in the Victorian society. Men were involved in industrial working, politics, business, etc. In other words, all jobs were for males. Women had to live in a lonely and secluded lifestyle. In other terms, a private life. In the novel, “The Importance of Being Earnest” written by Oscar Wilde, he satirizes the gender roles in the novel. Wilde uses satire commentary to comically explain about…show more content…
The fact that the tone of voice of Gwendolen sound like if she is a dominant figure or superior. However, during this time period of the Victorian era, women are not seen as dominate, but rather weak. Wilde exploits this concept of women weakness by giving Gwendolen a dominant voice. Furthermore, Gwendolen is reversing the role of traditional gender roles by implying that she can still clean the keep the house clean and take care of it, and at the same time having a position of power in society. Gwendolen remarks that she finds it attractive that men can do the exact same duties when do, even though if the men. In a scholarly online article, Gender Roles of Victorian Era for Men and Women, the author comments that, “Women were not assigned responsible jobs in general. She was to give birth to children and look after the house”. As you can see the Victorian era is totally different from the novel. Women had one job and only one job, which was to take care of the house and kids as the online article says. In addition they were not as superior as men, they were characterized as weak. Gwendolen is explaining the fact that she enjoys when men clean up the house and also saying that women can do both cleaning the house and taking care of the kids, and have power like men. Furthermore, her tone of voice with Cecily makes her sound like she is dominant. In the Victorian era, this was usually not allowed.…show more content…
Lady Bracknell is in total control of this situation. She bluntly tells them both that they are not going to get engaged. Even the fact that Lady Bracknell is deciding for Gwendolen who to marry and who not to marry. This act of controlling is definitely noticeable. In addition, when she presents herself first instead of her husband, shows this dominance in the family. In other terms, Lady Bracknell believed she is in total control of the family and not the husband. Then, Lady Bracknell asks all these questions to get to know about Jack. This whole situation is controlled by Lady Bracknell the husband did not even get a word on this life changing event. Lastly, Lady Bracknell commands Gwendolen to leave and go to the carriage. This again shows an act of empowerment, even though Gwendolen is her daughter, Lady Bracknell still has this dominant personality and demands her to go to the carriage. In a scholarly online article, Gender Roles of Victorian Era for Men and Women, the author comments that, “a married woman was completely under the guidance and supervision of her husband. Motherhood was an achievement in the life of women, but only formally. Mothers had to be submissive and meek”. During the Victorian era, married women, such as Lady Bracknell, were under the supervision of their husband so all decisions were made from the husband, the wife would just have to follow. Married women still did not
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