Dystopiaism In Lord Of The Flies

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Lord of the Flies is an enthralling classic fictional novel written by William Golding, published in 1954 by Faber and Faber’s publishing house in England. The novel had not been a great success at the time of its initial publication, being rejected by twenty one publishers, and then having sold fewer than three thousand copies during 1955 before going out of print. However, it soon went on to becoming a bestseller, and gained widespread popularity in the academic world, becoming known as “Lord of the Campus.” Lord of the Flies is a thought-provoking novel that has ignited many debates amongst critics and academics with its brutal portrayal of human nature. Golding’s novel had been a way of contradicting the shared pre-World War belief that…show more content…
The book pulls the reader along with its dark, entrancing imagery and intense, spine-tingling sequence of events. However, Golding’s work is deemed to be manipulative, to a certain extent, due to its overload of forced symbolism and his lack of space for open interpretation. Like many other works of classic literature (such as Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray), Golding’s characters’ main purpose is to simply be symbolically significant, and not to appeal to the readers emotionally, hence why the characters are hard to relate to, despite them being laden with symbolic meaning. The characters barely seem to have any significant human emotions, except those which contribute to the characters’ symbolic meaning. Simply putting it, the characters are not depictions of real human beings, but concrete ideas and solid symbols being personified into young…show more content…
By underlining the complex darkness and chaos of human nature, Golding's work brings depth to the typical adventure book plot, and presents a thought-stimulating incitement for his
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