Scambler's Perspective

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Scambler’s perspective Scambler and Hopkins (1986), are the medical sociologists that have further developed the Goffman’s ideas of information management in their research of people with epilepsy (Cooke and Philipin, 2008). Based on Goffman’s (1968), stigma was known to signify an “ontological deficit” which was violating against the social norms of identity or being (Scambler, 2009). Scambler proposed stigma can be clearly understood by distinguished them into ‘felt’ and ‘enacted’ stigma (Scambler, 2009). Enacted stigma occurred when there was obvious discrimination against people in view of their socially unacceptability (Scambler, 2009). As for, felt stigma was the developed of feeling being shame which was associated with the…show more content…
Felt normative stigma refers when the individual was more aware with the expected impact of stigma will drive them to take cautious action to avoid enacted stigma (Scambler, 2009). The one that stigmatised, which Goffman’s labelled them as ‘normal’ will encounter internalised stigma when they have common bias on the labelled which leads to enacted stigma (Scambler, 2009). Moreover, the one being stigma will experience internalise stigma as they are agreed with the stereotypes given by the labeller (Scambler,…show more content…
There are six components causing stigma associated with mental illness, and the sequence of the component does not suggest the order of the impact instead it show how each component influence among themselves (Link and Phelan, 2013). In conclusion, Link and Phelan (2013) concluded that differential distribution of social, economic and political power were the most significant in contribution to stigma. Scambler (2009) agreed to Link and Phelan statement and stated stigma required power to stigmatise. According to Parker and Aggleton (2003) as cited by Scambler (2009), stigma function when culture, power and difference intersect among one another affected individual suffering from mental
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