Analysis Of Disgrace By J. M Coetzee

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Whoever reads the novel Disgrace by J.M Coetzee can notice that there are many scenes that the author wants us to interpret. Fiction novels are, most of the time, based on the imagination of the author so that readers can interpret the novel based on their situation and past experiences. This novel clearly has many scenes in which the purpose of the author is to make the readers think and analyze the scenes in their own point of view. This means that the novel can have different interpretations depending on who the reader is. By examining different scenes and David Lurie’s role in the novel, we can better understand his position and point of view throughout the many difficult situations shown in the novel. One of the scenes that caught my…show more content…
The author presented us that scene in a way that we could imagine the violence without talking so much about it. Per the article “Rape in J. M. Coetzee’s Fiction,” Petersen states “Lucy’s rape is not even narrated; what we read are the recollections that David tries to assemble while talking to her.” I agree with the author of the article because I too could notice how the author didn’t describe so much how the incident that took place. We could understand what happened with the questions David asked Lucy. However, she didn’t want to talk about it. Then, I felt disappointed because she didn’t even want to talk to the police about what happened even though David, her father, insisted that she did. “You want to know why I have not laid a particular charge with the police. I will tell you, as long as you agree not to raise the subject again. The reason is that, as far as I am concerned, what happened to me is a purely private matter. In another time, in another place it might be held to be a public matter. But in this place, at this time, it is not. It is my business, mine alone.” (Coetzee, 112). In my opinion, she didn’t want to be judged or go through all the legal process. She didn’t want to tell her story because she thought it was a private matter: something she had to get over…show more content…
This was the part which caught my attention the most. David literally gave up on his dog. In this scene, Bev asked David, “Are you giving him up?” They were talking about the dog, “Yes,” said David, “I am giving him up.” (Coetzee 215). This is the ending of the novel, it may seem like nonsense at first but when you analyze the idea that the author is representing with the action of David, you understand the entire meaning of the ending of the novel. Per Meljac, the author of the article “Love and Disgrace” “Part of the mystery of this final scene comes from the realization that David’s act comes as an act of love, rather than as yet another act of self-satisfaction.” David did this for pure love. Every person who has read this novel can notice that David’s life was full of disgrace, disgrace that he, somehow saw represented in his dog. “The dog shows David genuine affection, unlike the cold affection of the prostitute David frequents in Cape Town. Affection, indeed, unlike the kind he sought from Melanie, the young college female David essentially rapes only to lose his job” Eric stated. This dog showed David’s affection, an emotion that David was clearly lacking. David did not want his dog to suffer: he himself had suffered his entire life so that’s why he decided to kill
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