School Canteen Literature Review

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CHAPTER 2 REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES In reviewing literature and studies related to the study, the researchers will be able to thoroughly understand and support their chosen study. FOREIGN AND LOCAL STUDIES (remove the numbers in your paragraphs, follow the format given) (please take note that all your studies must be not more than 5 years later than this year) 1.At first glance one might tend to overlook the humble school canteen, but on reflection I think most people would agree that the canteen is one of the most important parts of school life. In this post I will consider two ways in which school canteens play indispensable roles in the life and functioning of schools. School administrators need to have a definite…show more content…
Progressive canteens also forge synergistic links with schools’ food and nutrition departments and agricultural science departments, where they exist. School canteens should serve food and drinks which are low in saturated fats, sugar, salt, and food dyes. More fruit, fruit juices, vegetables and whole grain bread should be on the menu. There should be fewer soft drinks, no energy drinks or sports drinks, no alcohol, and no deep-fried food. It will be necessary to retrain students’ palates in some instances, but this is in the best interests of the students. As mentioned earlier, school canteens can become trouble zones if they are not closely regulated and supervised by the administration. Canteens can be a barometer for student conduct. If preventive measures are not put in place and enforced, lunchtime can be chaotic and this chaos can spill over into classes after lunch because some students may be late and unsettled. Some may even want to continue eating during class. Administrators, school canteen committees, and operators must implement systems to enforce queuing and good behaviour in the canteen. A canteen duty roster for…show more content…
Good social skills require good communication skills. Because we communicate verbally and nonverbally, both of these types of skills contribute to how well students relate to their peers. Children with language problems often have trouble socially because they have difficulty understanding the words that other children use and/or putting their ideas into words to express these ideas to others. They can’t find the right words to use or easily put them together in a way that makes sense. They may have trouble understanding or telling jokes. They may not know the current jargon or idioms that their peers use. They may also have trouble keeping up the pace of conversations, particularly in a group. It is hard for them to jump into a conversation. Other children, who may have good language skills, have trouble with nonverbal communication. They can’t “read” body language, facial expressions or tone of voice. These children interpret words literally and may miss the majority of the intended communication. Much of accurate communication depends on nonverbal cues and gestures. To communicate competently, a child must be able to process the whole message sent by another and integrate the verbal and nonverbal components of the message. Children with verbal and nonverbal communication difficulties often resort to temper tantrums or “meltdowns” to communicate emotions such as anger and frustration. They may appear uncooperative, fresh or rude and may be called oppositional and/or
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