Paradise Lost And Oroonoko Character Analysis

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The most obvious value of a second in command is their ultimate respect and undying support for their leader. This can be seen in Beelzebub, Aboab, and Tuscan in both Oroonoko and Paradise Lost. Respect and support prove to be useful qualities for the protagonist of Paradise Lost and Oroonoko. Satan and Oroonoko are able to use their second in commands for their ultimate benefit. The value of these second in commands can vary with his integrity. Both Beelzebub and Aboan are trusted friends to their leader and never show signs of betrayal. Tuscan, on the other hand, is not a friend to Oroonoko and in the end, betrays him. The value of having a second in command in Paradise Lost and Oroonoko vary with the personal gain of the “second”, true friendship…show more content…
On the contrary, the reason and logic of these “seconds” don’t amount to anything substantial in their storylines besides being credited to their characters. Both Beelzebub and Aboan fall into a restrained state of character as they instead of using their logic and reason to aid their commander they simply do exactly as their commander asks. In Paradise Lost, after their fall, the devils debate their next move in the Pandemonium. Mammon suggests creating their own kingdom in Hell which is received with the most applause and agreement. Beelzebub is cunning enough to point out that the idea of being “Princes of Hell” (II.315) is false because they are still under the control of God. Beelzebub then proposes a new plan of corrupting God’s new creation, man. This plan was not created by Beelzebub but was “first devised by Satan, and in part proposed” (II.379-380). Satan uses Beelzebub as a tool to keep a facade of democracy and so he can theatrically volunteer as the brave and courageous devil who will venture to Earth alone and complete this…show more content…
He is not a three-dimensional character as Oroonoko is but he proves to be a slightly more complex character than Aboan and Beelzebub because he isn’t an automatic “second” to Oroonoko. This is shown as Tuscans integrity and faithfulness as a second is challenged because of the circumstances involved. Caesar (at this time Oroonoko is identified by his slave name) gathers together the slaves of Suriname and rallies them to join him and escape slavery. Immediately Tuscan shows great signs of respect for Caesar as he bows at his feet when he is making his speech about breaking free from slavery. Tuscan doesn’t immediately fall under Caesar by agreeing with his plan instead he voices his own concern with running away which shows signs of his own confidence and leadership, “But oh! Consider we are husbands, and parents too, and have things more dear to us than life; our wives and children, unfit for travel in those unpassable woods, mountains, and bogs.We have not only difficult lands to overcome, but rivers to wade, and mountains to encounter; ravenous beasts of prey” (43). Ultimately Tuscan agrees with Caesar's plan but continues to assert his own personal dominance as “Tuscan then demanded what he would do” (43). Tuscan becomes Caesar's second in the fact that they both seek freedom, but Caesar seeks freedom for honor while Tuscan seeks freedom for the love and concern of his fellow slaves as well as
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