Secondary Source: Serial Criminal

1213 Words5 Pages
603-LPE-MS (21): Researching Eighteenth-Century Crime Writing Feb. 16, 2017 Secondary Source Worksheet Due Date: Feb. 23rd Worth: 5% Directions: Complete the five sections NAME: Dani Karam Maaz SECONDARY SOURCE: Serial Criminal Terms: Define three new terms from your secondary source. 1. Pastiche - It is an artwork consisting of a large variety of pieces from various sources. 2. Chartist - A person who advocates chartism. Chartism being a 19th century British movement led by the working class which aimed to make the British political system more democratic. 3. Triptych - A set of three individual yet associated pieces of art meant to be appreciated together. The Title: Explain the significance of…show more content…
Serial is often used to describe a criminal repetitive wrongdoings (i.e serial killer). However, serial can also be used to describe a series of works. In the essay, we learn that the central topic of the essay, Jack Sheppard, is a well-known criminal who constantly commits crime. Additionally, the life of Jack Sheppard was once published in penny journals, a well known form of serial literature. Subsequently, Baldwin’s title of her essay addresses both of these details in a witty…show more content…
Ø The Literary Devices: Locate an example of five of the following eight literary devices in the chapter: Contrast- Baldwin uses contrast to introduce the fact that Ainsworth makes his usage of historical sources evident in his text. Baldwin stated that Scott would use fiction as the “central device of [his] historic novel” whereas Ainsworth often foregrounded historical sources. This contrast in styles accentuates the fact that Ainsworth foregrounded his sources, hence making it a contrast. This literary device was used in order to prove that Ainsworth used historical sources like no author did in the past, thus revolutionizing the novel at that time. Paradox- An example of a paradox in this text would be when Baldwin notes that Sheppard had a talent at both breaking into house as he did breaking out of prisons. This literary device was used to further accentuate the point that he used an array of historical sources, some being truthful while others fictional (this one being true). Call to Authority- An instance of a call to authority in the text would be when Baldwin mentioned the works of both Lukács and Maxwell to accentuate the fact that Ainsworth was typically ignored by “theorists of the historic novel” (Baldwin). This call to authority was used to introduce the topic that, despite having numerous critics, Ainsworth’s work was indeed revolutionary to his
Open Document