Segregation In New Orleans

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New Orleans can be described as the most multicultural and musical city in America. In New Orleans, nothing seemed to be able to stop the music from flourishing, not legalizing prostitution nor prohibition. The multi-ethnic population had an energetic/lively attitude that accompanied the music produced in the city. In New Orleans music was omnipresent; there were always bands traveling around the city performing in concerts, clubs, parties, dances and even funerals. Bands in New Orleans were not strictly black, but a number of races. With all of the different nationalities, there was a lot of integration within the city, and there were a lot of people who did not particularly like each other, including blacks and whites, however they supported their community because they all appreciated the culture that New Orleans had to offer.…show more content…
Blacks and whites were now considered “separate but equal”, where in public they had separate bathrooms and water fountains to say the least. Because of Jim Crow Laws, Creoles (individuals with French or black ancestry) were labeled with African-Americans; this “uptown/downtown” theory said that blacks (uptown) and Creoles of Color (downtown) were to be mixed because of the segregation laws. Although these laws were set upon the African Americas and Creoles, jazz music still flourished in the city of New Orleans. There were always events being held in New Orleans, and with each event, there was always
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