Segregation In US History

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There are certain events in the United States’ past that bring great embarrassment to its citizens. One of these embarrassing black marks on the United States’ not so perfect record is slavery. The unbelievably cruel treatment of black men, women, and children seems unreal, and the way that people lawfully treated other human beings as property is disgraceful. When the United States’ founding fathers declared independence from Britain in 1776 slavery was not the issue at hand, and it took almost ninety years of change, and four years of bloodshed caused by a civil war for the abolition of slavery to occur. However, the mistreatment of African Americans did not stop there, as U.S. citizens continued to stain the canvas of U.S. history with unequal…show more content…
The abolition of slavery did not stop racism entirely, and black citizens are still considered lesser than their white counterparts. The U.S. government forbade blacks to use some of the same facilities, restrooms, or even water fountains as whites, and it essentially took a revolution before a racist government saw its misdoings. Once again, the embarrassing past shows the unneeded extraneous sacrifices made, all in the belief of desegregation. Slavery and segregation are embarrassing marks on U.S. history that specifically focus on race, and in the fight for equality, gender has also been a substantial, and embarrassing…show more content…
citizens to remodel the laws and correct the issues neglected by the U.S. government. This theme can act as a lesson for U.S. citizens in that action is needed from them, for a controversial change to occur. However, considering more recent events, it might have become clear that citizens of the U.S. have not quite learned from the embarrassments of their country’s past; as it seems that there are some improvements that within the U.S. government. The improvements needed for a better U.S. democracy include a way to individualize and localize the voting system, as well as clean up political campaigns and try to destroy corruption within the U.S. government

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