Seigneuries: Old France Vs. New France

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Seigneuries-were large plot of lands along the St.Lawrence River. Separated by fences, thats was divided into many long narrow fields which were given to the Habitants to live and farm. This was part of the Seigneurial system.on their seigneury they had a lumber mill, a grain mill, and a church on it. They also had a fair size amount of land for any social events. As the land was passed through generation the the strips became smaller. The houses had a stone foundation with square cut timbers. The space between the timber was filled with a substance called mortar. Roofs were made out of thatch which was a roof covered in straw, reeds, palm leaves, overlapping boards, or a similar material so snow would just slide off. The windows were made…show more content…
They took an oath to the king and were expected to live on their seigneuries, collect rents and dues from their census. Seigneurs could not ask for too much work from the habitants, because they wanted them to stay. (Habitants were better off in New France than in France.) Being a seigneur in New France meant status, but not wealth, but in reality the money they made from the seigneuries (the cens et rentes and other dues) was often not enough to cover the costs of maintaining the land. Seigneurs had social status. The Habitants had more independence, land and…show more content…
They had to pay rent and taxes to the seigneur, though they co-owned the land with the seigneur, and even had to work entirely free, for the benefit of the seigneur a few days each year. They had to build a house and farm land. Next, is they paid dues to the seigneur, and use the seigneur’s mill and pay the miller. Also, Habitants gave a percentage of his produce (fish, crops, animals) to the seigneur annually. The seigneury was a large plot of land divided into many long narrow fields that would be given to each of their children once they were a family. Government structure The system of government in New France was relatively simple with most of the power resting in the hands of only three men. The Governor General. The Bishop and the intendant. At the top of the ladder was the King of France. King Louis XIV was born on September 5, 1638, in Saint-Germaine-en-Laye, France. He became king in 1643. As of 1661, he started reforming France. In 1667 he invaded the Spanish Netherlands.The reign of France’s Louis XIV (1638-1718), known as the Sun King, lasted for 72 years, longer than that of any other known European sovereign. In that time, he transformed the monarchy, ushered in a golden age of art and literature, presided over a dazzling royal court at Versailles, annexed key territories and established his country as the dominant European
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