Selma Themes

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In SELMA, a movie directed by an African American women, Ava DuVernays showcases a very specific movement in our history’s book space/time when Dr. Martin Luther King (David Oyelowo) organized marches and led dangerous campaigns to win equal voting rights for African American people who were prevented from registering to vote in the south. The movie’s central action is about the Voting Rights Act movement in 1965, which led to three dramatic marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. The central theme that revolves around the film is not about Dr. King’s biography or his past achievements of Civil Rights Act, but the tough political battle he faces and the portrayal of the many follower voices and efforts that helped him to make these marches …show more content…

King) being honored his Nobel Peace Prize for his civil rights efforts, and these peace efforts are contrasted by the 1963 church bombings, where four African American girls were killed. Annie Lee Cooper (Oprah Winfrey) plays a pivotal role and faces rejection every time she tries to register to vote, by the white racist registrar who keeps questioning her impossible quizzes for her to qualify. The overlapping depiction with the bombings and non-voting rights, playing as a catalyst prompted Dr. King to meet with President Johnson (Tom Wilkinson) to urge him to push for federal legislations to allow black citizens to register to vote. But the commander in chief had a different agenda, and he replied, “This voting’ thing’s just gonna have to wait”. Dr. King replies back stating “It can’t,” and takes the civil rights movement to Selma, where activist Diane Nash (Tessa Thompson) states that this would be the right place for staging peaceful marches. Some of the main stimulating characters played in the movie are Coretta Scott King (Carmen Ejogo) as wife of Dr. King, James Bevel (Common), George Wallace (Tim Roth) as Alabama governor, Jimmie Lee Jackson (Keith Stanfield) and Malcolm X (Nigel …show more content…

King was not a part of, the marchers were brutally assaulted by state troopers with whips, bats, billy clubs and even before they tried to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge. The marchers ran for their life and Jimmie got shot by the state trooper in the restaurant when trying to hide. The politics played by the FBI director, George Wallace and Johnson could not stop Dr. King from continuing the fight. The second march began with John and Boyton, while crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge, they approach the troopers, who ask them to turn back and when they marchers just stood they were again brutally attacked. This brutality was showcased on national television and John and Boyton injuries gained the momentum on a national level, but a cost of lives which Dr. King dint want. With the death of Reeb, the white American who joined the second march, Dr. King is criticized for his action from all corners, including Johnson, SNCC activists and his people. The federal judge gives the approval for the third march with federal safety for the marchers and this time Dr. King led the marches from Selma to Montgomery and there were no attacks this time and when the marchers reached Montgomery, Dr. King delivers a speech which ultimately led to President Johnson (Tom Wilkinson) talking to the congress and then finally signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which was one the most significant achievements of Dr. King’s activist

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