Senate's Impeachment

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The Senate has the only power to confirm those of the President 's appointments that require consent, and to ratify treaties. There are, however, two exceptions to this rule, the House must approve appointments to the Vice Presidency and any treaty that involves foreign trade. The Senate also tries those that are decided to begin the impeachment process, cases for federal officials referred to it by the House. In order to pass legislation and send it to the President for his signature, both the House and the Senate must agree on the terms in the bill by majority vote. If the President vetoes a bill, they may override his veto by passing the bill again in each chamber with at least two-thirds of each body voting in favor. The first step in…show more content…
Congress, as one of the three coequal branches of government, is ascribed significant powers by the Constitution. All legislative power in the government is vested in Congress, meaning that it is the only part of the government that can make new laws or change existing laws. The President may veto bills Congress passes, but Congress may also override a veto by a two-thirds vote in both the Senate and the House of Representatives. Part of Congress 's exercise of legislative authority is the establishment of an annual budget for the government. To this end, Congress levies taxes and tariffs to provide funding for essential government services. If enough money cannot be raised to fund the government, then Congress may also authorize borrowing to make up the difference. Congress can also mandate spending on specific items: legislatively directed spending, commonly known as "earmarks," specifies funds for a particular project, rather than for a government…show more content…
Instead, the Senate selects one of their own members, usually junior members of the majority party, to preside over the Senate each day. The Vice President has an office in the West Wing of the White House, as well as in the nearby Eisenhower Executive Office Building. Like the President, he also maintains an official residence, at the United States Naval Observatory in Northwest Washington, D.C. This peaceful mansion, has been the official home of the Vice President since 1974 — previously, Vice Presidents had lived in their own private residences. The Vice President also has his own limousine, operated by the United States Secret Service, and flies on the same aircraft the President uses — but when the Vice President is aboard, the craft are referred to as Air Force Two and Marine Two. Every day, the President of the United States is faced with scores of decisions, each with important consequences for America 's future. To provide the President with the support that he or she needs to govern effectively, the Executive Office of the President (EOP) was created in 1939 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The EOP has responsibility for tasks ranging from communicating the President 's message to the American people to promoting our trade interests abroad. The EOP, overseen by the White House Chief of Staff, has traditionally been home to many of the President 's closest advisers. While Senate
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