Sensation Vs Perception

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We as humans, have always known about our five senses: sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. Did you know that we also have some other ones such as balance, temperature, pain, acceleration, kinesthetic, and internal senses? Sometimes we think that a certain sense is more important than another one. For example, sight seems a lot more necessary than smell could ever be. However, they all serve an important purpose, all working similarly, but they each receive different information and send it to a specialized region in the brain. All the senses work together, so we can interpret our world. Two of the ways are by sensation and perception, which cooperate together, but take on separate roles. “Sensation is the stimulation of a sensory receptor …show more content…

Furthermore, perception is how one “receives” this feeling or thought, and gives meaning to it through memories and emotions. Perception is mainly how we interpret a sensation”(Sensation & Perception, 2014). One of the sensory organs that we have is the eye. Our vision is the most important sense, because we use it the most. Our eyes carry messages to our brain, so we are able to identify the image. Being able to see starts with light being bent, and is projected on the back of our eye, and is then transferred to action potentials that go to our …show more content…

When we taste something, we recognize if something if the food is sweet, bitter, sour, or salty. Even the tongue sends messages from itself to the tongue. “The receptor cells for taste are housed in roughly 10,000 taste buds, which are found on the tip, sides, and back of the tongue. The taste buds are embedded in the tongue’s papillae, bumps that you can see if you look at your tongue in the mirror. So when we are eating something, the chemical substances in the food dissolve in saliva and go into the crevices between the papillae, where they come into contact with the taste buds. The taste buds then release a neurotransmitter that causes adjacent neurons to fire, which sends a nerve impulse to the parietal lobe of the brain and to the limbic system”(Maisto & Morris, 2010). “TV ads do not contain hidden, subliminal messages, but they do attempt to make viewers associate products with idealized images and lifestyles. They do this by trying to play on our senses. Visual cues (the models) and auditory cues (the voice-over) are the most obvious examples. But tactile cues (a car’s leather interior) and kinesthetic cues (the feeling of a test drive created by placing the camera inside a moving car) are also common”(Maisto & Morris, 2010, p.

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