Sevek And The Holocaust Analysis

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At the end of World War II, the Nazis had seized the lives of six million Jews, with over one and a half million of them being children and teenagers. The Nazis advocated killing children since children were often regarded as non-productive, as well as symbolizing the continuation of Jewish existence in German society; therefore, they were among the first victims who were sent to their deaths in order to ensure the total destruction of the Jewish people. In the book Sevek and the Holocaust: the Boy Who Refused to Die, the memoir of an adolescent Jew during the time of the holocaust, shows the real struggles children faced during the holocaust to survive, even though they were unwanted and considered dangerous to the Nazis. Sevek, along with…show more content…
The Nazi party won in 1932, swearing to resolve these issues, which in return began the persecution of the Jews after Hitler arose to power. Jewish children were commonly harassed and humiliated. For example, in meeting “the boy who refused to die,” Sidney Finkel recalled going to the bakery and having people in line shout out against serving him since he was a Jew. Anti-semitism became widespread not only in Germany, but Poland became increasingly difficult conditions for Jews. Along with Sevek, Aryan kids began to discriminate against Jews, and eventually Jewish kids were segregated into their own schools away from the Aryan race. Nazis proceeded to introduce anti-Jewish decrees, which gradually eliminated the rights of Jewish citizens.1 Jews weren’t allowed to have government jobs, own property, or run their own businesses. Sevek’s father, who owned a timber yard, had all property taken away from him, but anticipated this to occur as he sold his business to a German man, Mr. Schultz.2 The German occupation of Poland on the first of September, 1939, triggered the beginning of World War II. In response to the other countries being rapidly occupied, the Nazis established the anti-semitic decrees in the conquered territories. These laws included wearing of yellow stars mandatory, and the establishment of the…show more content…
Memoirs and primary sources give fascinating insights into the ways children dealt with the deterioration of their life, coping with their continually changing perspective on life, both practically and emotionally.This makes a huge impact on kids of today, as it teaches them that the Holocaust was not simply an accident that happened in history; it occurred because choices were made by those who abused power to not only legalized discrimination, but allowed prejudice, hatred, and ultimately mass genocide to occur. The Jewish people did nothing wrong, yet the government blamed all of society’s problems on them. It teaches kids silence and indifference to the suffering of others, can however unintentionally, perpetuate these problems, so stand up against what is wrong. It is also important from children to listen to their elders and the legacy they leave behind when they go to pass down for
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