Sex In Lady Chatterley's Erotica

1578 Words7 Pages
Sex, in the existence of human evolution, has transformed beyond the carnal desires of mankind. Through the lascivious influence gained from Eros, the god of sexual attraction, to the modern way of placing wild rutting into tall passages of text, humans view the lustful actions as, not only pleasurable but distasteful to consume in broad daylight. Literature has manifested its own personal universe in which Victorian rules of modesty do not exist. Modern works of literature have shown, almost enforced, the idea of causality during sexual relationships. The censorship of erotic literature forces vivid alterations of society 's perception of intercourse and romance, which, not only damages the self but as seen in D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s…show more content…
Pornographic literature became feared by government and religious personnel as the thought of how the individual mind changed through literature was threatening (Watkins). Lady Chatterley’s Lover, was one of the explicit pieces to receive copious amounts of backlash due to the idea of modesty and class in Britain during the Victorian era. Lawrence, as stated by Catherine Holdsworth, took the risk of writing a novel that broke the “boundaries...put in place to keep classes apart” (The Trials and Tribulations of Lady Chatterley’s Publication, 2). His obscene language shredded the separation between classes—a change that shaped society up until the publication of Valley of the Dolls in the 1960s. Jacqueline Susann’s contributions succeeded in the transformation of character tropes for men and women in erotic…show more content…
Objectively, Ioannou is stating that the presence of men in erotica, is to boost the sensuality of the women via their urges to have sex with them. Still, this hypersexualized ideology set in place creates the mentality that oppression is necessary for the ladies in said novels to experience a sexual awakening. Masculine tropes are described as “the related issue of manhood and the means by which a young man 's character is formed” (Ioannou, 144). Erotica presents more than causal fornication, but a world in which readers are able to learn the trials and tribulations of a sexual relationship without the scares that come from being in one physically. Regardless, the argument can be made that if ‘manhood’ is a development of the mind once exposed to sexual feelings, and in such, women grow from a man’s new found lust, it is inherently negative stimuli to the developing
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