Shah Mahal Analysis

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The size is smaller on the sides, although similar designs appear on it. Even though, coming out of such elaborately planned structure as Taj is, it can be seen like coming out of an era, which had gone by. Added to the world an era, in more than one way, an era that has been kept alive by the wonder that is Taj Mahal. Never has anyone before him or since has ever seen such a grandiose memorial built by a man for his beloved. It is the silent and majestic beauty of the mausoleum itself that seems to furnish irrefutable proof of the nobility and intensity of Shah Jahan 's affection for his wife. The narrative of the origins of Taj Mahal is as we all know the compassion of Shah Jahan for his beloved wife. There are other theories about the origin…show more content…
He might have built it by finding some other excuse, for example, “in the name of religion, or perhaps as a memorial to conquest, after killing hundreds and thousands of people." (Begley, 1979) In this essay, we are not going this far in castigating Shah Jahan 's character, however, some explanation is essential. The Taj has the charismatic control to amaze nearly all its viewers. To instill a sense of magnificence, a sense of transcendent majesty through the monument. If Love is not behind it all, what is? Keyserling has an intuition that the Taj is "not even necessarily a funeral monument" which seems to be on the right trail. “First of all, in light of what we know of Shah Jahan 's excessive vanity, it is clear that the Taj was also intended to symbolize his own glory and not merely his devotion.” (Begley, 1979). Just as Shah Jahan had started to accomplish his illustrious desires, the passing of his royal consort struck him as a cruel blow, as she was the mother of his living heirs. A blow of fate it was, which had caused a few of his major disappointments in his series of…show more content…
Disappointing and dissatisfying though as it was, the passing of his beloved wife might have acted to spur the initiation of a testimonial thought. However, it also served as an image, as of Shah Jahan 's royal destiny to erect a glorious structure. Because since his early days he has always had a great eye for buildings. Another one of his coronation jewels included to his already astounding crown. A tangible manifestation of his magnificent obsession with his own enormity. According to Shah Jahan’s early historian, Muhammad Amin Qazwini, who writes in 1630s: “And a dome of high foundation and a building of great magnificence was founded—a similar and equal to it the eye of the Age has not seen under these nine vaults of the enamel-blue sky, and of anything resembling it the ear of Time has not heard in any of the past ages…it will be the masterpiece of the days to come, and that which adds to the astonishment of humanity at large.” (Koch, 2005). The monument was not only a magnificent burial place for Shah Jahan’s beloved wife , but also it was an affirmation of the power and glory of Shah Jahan and his rule as—and it was pointed out explicitly by the Emperor’s main historian Abd al-Hamid Lahawri: “They laid the plan for a magnificent building and a dome of
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